Friday, June 30, 2017

Week Ending 2 July 2017

So much of this week has revolved around one of Miss 16's main passions - birding. On Monday night it was the evening meeting of our birding group. The speaker did a great job presenting the results of long term research into Black Petrels, a seabird species that breeds only on a couple of our offshore islands. She also mentioned that they often have opportunities for volunteer field research assistants. Needless to say Miss 16 was very interested and will definitely be following this opportunity up!

Tuesday saw us making a journey across town to the sewage ponds. Unfortunately, the bird we were hoping to spot wasn't to be found. Not to be deterred we made a return trip on Saturday and were rewarded by good views of the bird - a White-winged black tern - hawking for insects over one of the oxidation ponds.

Wednesday's mail saw the arrival of the national birding magazine and journal, so lots of time was spent on bird-related reading.


Miss 16 has three pieces in this edition of the magazine and is busy drafting an article for publication in the journal.
On Thursday we attended a full day workshop on braided rivers. Lots of great bird related presentations, since many of our most endangered species only breed in braided river habitat. But also lots of work focusing on other creatures that live in braided rivers - fish, grasshoppers -  as well as papers focusing on the ecosystem as a whole. Given that Miss 16 is inching closer to needing to make some decisions about her future, it's interesting to see what areas especially grab her attention. Hopefully a clue that will help make it easier to decide what and where to study at the university level.




The goal of the workshop was to share knowledge which will help increase the survival of species like this Kaki, which rely on the braided river habitat.

We realized that time was running out to participate in this year's garden bird survey, on Friday. Our temporary accommodation basically lacks a garden,  and therefore there aren't a lot of birds to be seen, unless we lean out a window and peer over a neighbours' fence. Instead we took the opportunity to walk to a homestead and public gardens just a few blocks away, where we found a sheltered spot and counted birds for an hour. Far more species than we see at home, but we did miss being able to count from the warmth of indoors! 

Part of the garden where we sat for an hour doing our bird survey. It also featured a lovely little gazebo with stained glass windows. We thought we might have had to take shelter in it if the wind increased or it started to rain. Thankfully shelter wasn't required.




I allowed Miss 16 to take a break from most of her normally scheduled schoolwork this week, so that she could focus on one particular project. She has been asked to submit a short paper on the Cox's Sandpiper to Notornis, the national ornithological journal. That bird was first seen in New Zealand late last year and Miss 16 played a role in it being officially recognized, which is I think why she was asked to write this paper. That, and right now people are conscious about fostering and encouraging young birders. But writing for a national, peer-reviewed scientific journal is a little intimidating and requires significant effort. So rather than try and squeeze it in between regular homeschooling and trampoline coaching and training (and trust me many days don't have any time left between those two things) I offered to clear her schedule so she'd have big chunks of time to work on the first draft.

The week wasn't totally bird focused though. Miss 16 continued with Animal Behaviour, since that is her longest course - the one that won't be finished when the rest of her planned work is scheduled to be complete. She also did a little grammar most days and we watched a movie since Dh somehow managed to find The Journey of August King for us. That was the one I thought we'd have to miss from her Movies as Literature course because I couldn't find it anywhere. And there was also trampolining, her regular coaching and training plus she volunteered to assess recreational athletes who were trying to earn incentive badges.

By rights I should be busy unpacking now, instead of writing a blog post. Sadly, our move back home has been delayed. It's only by a few days, but the delay is frustrating, not to mention financially costly to us. Despite some advantages to our temporary accommodation I'm definitely looking forward to getting back into our own place. Hopefully this week. The movers are booked so it had better happen! Just to add to the fun we had a call from the contractors to tell us they had damaged the carpet in our living room and it would need to be replaced. Of course that won't be done by the time we move back so we'll have to put up with concrete floors in the living room for a week or so, not to mention the hassle of moving the furniture back into the room, only to have to move it all back out again. Sigh...

Linking to the Weekly Wrap-Up and to Homeschool Highlights

4 comments:

  1. I hope she did a great job on the paper. I can see it being a bit daunting for her. But rather cool she had a part in finding that bird eh?

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  2. Oh ugh, sorry to hear about the housing woes! That's a shame (carpet and delays, both).

    On the other hand, it sounds like a really good week for your daughter, and that's wonderful :-)

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  3. What a fantastic opportunity to contribute to the scientific journal! I'm sure it was a bit daunting, but a great achievement and honor!

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  4. Wow! Invited to contribute to a scientific journal! That's amazing! I wish Miss 16 well as she writes. What a wonderful example of following one's passions!

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